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Children in Scotland reveals full programme for Annual Conference 2024

Children in Scotland has today revealed details of the packed programme for its upcoming Annual Conference 2024, with keynote speeches and workshops set to address the sector’s most challenging and important issues. 

Held on Wednesday 29 and Thursday 30 May at Murrayfield Stadium, Edinburgh, the flagship event will bring together delegates, partners and supporters from across the children’s sector, with a range of keynote speakers, exhibitors, workshops and networking sessions available over the two days. 

One of the highlights of the programme, on the first day of the conference, Jimmy Paul, Head of the Scottish Violence Reduction Unit, will use his keynote to discuss the growing concern of behaviour in schools, while exploring the many challenges faced by young people today.  

With a varied career managing health and social care services, and having co-chaired the Workforce Group on the Independent Care Review, Jimmy is uniquely placed to examine the factors many experts believe are contributing to behavioural issues, including the fallout from the pandemic, which saw an entire generation of children missing out on crucial years of education, socialisation and connection, the current cost of living crisis, and increased use of social media across all age ranges. 

As well as offering evidence-based solutions, his speech will outline an emerging vision for the future, providing delegates with an informative and inspirational talk, which will focus on promoting collaboration across the sector. 

Jimmy Paul said: “I am delighted to be speaking at the Children in Scotland Annual Conference, where some of the most caring and determined people from across the nation gather.  At the Scottish Violence Reduction Unit, we know that improving the lives of children goes hand in hand with making Scotland the safest place in the world to live.  The world has changed drastically in recent years with the pandemic, the cost of living driving more families into poverty, and with changes in social media, which has impacted on experiences of childhood and the landscape of violence in Scotland.  I’m looking forward to exploring this in my keynote address and advocating for compassion and collaboration at the heart of everything we do."

Also on day one of the programme, which will be co-chaired by Nicola Killean, Children and Young People's Commissioner Scotland, Children in Scotland’s CEO Dr Judith Turbyne will discuss the challenges and opportunities facing the charity sector, encouraging conversation and debate among the audience. A panel discussion that day will also look at Artificial Intelligence (AI) in relation to child rights and safeguarding. 

Led by Steven Sweeney, Chief Executive of Voluntary Action South Lanarkshire and Children in Scotland board convenor, day two of the programme will open with keynote addresses from Minister for Children, Young People and Keeping the Promise, Natalie Don MSP and campaigner and activist Amal Azzudin. Dr Alexia Barrable, lecturer in Psychology and Education at Queen Margaret University, will discuss the impact of nature on health and wellbeing in the afternoon.  

On both days, workshops will be held by Scottish SPCA, Multi-Cultural Family Base, Aberlour Children’s Charity, Kibble, and many more organisations and charities across the sector, with topics covering everything from transitions for young people with additional support needs to a day in the life of a young carer. 

Children and young people’s voices will be central to the conference. Children in Scotland’s children and young people’s advisory group, Changing our World, have been involved in the planning of the event and will be present on both days, and students from Edinburgh College of Art have been invited to provide their take on what happens. Both days will see young people co-chairing, while many of the workshops will have children and young people’s voices embedded in them. 

Alongside powerful keynote speeches, informative panel discussions, and engaging workshops, both days of the Annual Conference will provide opportunities for practitioners to network and engage with colleagues.
 

Simon Massey, Children in Scotland’s Head of Engagement & Learning, said:This year’s conference promises to be one of our best. We have got such a varied programme, with contributions from across the whole sector, everyone will find something of interest. But the opportunity to connect with colleagues in person is not to be missed in our world of remote working.  

I’m particularly pleased to see how children and young people’s voices are being embedded throughout the programme – from planning to delivery and, afterwards, evaluating its success.  

Thanks to our sponsors and exhibitors, we have been able to keep prices low, so I hope to see as many people there as possible – it really will be worth a day or two away from work.” 

Click here to explore Day One of the programme 

Click here to explore Day Two of the programme 

For further info, interviews and all media requests please contact: press@childreninscotland.org.uk 

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Scottish Government announce £30 million mental health funding following youth-led report on support and services

The Scottish Government has announced £30 million for community-based mental health projects following an independent report into support and services by the Scottish Youth Parliament (SYP).

The Communities Mental Health and Wellbeing Fund for Adults, and the Children and Young People’s Community Mental Health and Wellbeing Supports funds have been awarded £15 million each for 2024-25, helping to support a range of groups and services around the country.

In 2022, Members of Scottish Youth Parliament (MSYPs) formed the Mental Health Investigation Team to deliver a youth-led approach for evaluating mental health services, which was supported by Children in Scotland, and subsequently called on the government to provide additional funding to address the barriers that prevent access to high quality support, particularly for children and young people.

Findings from the Mental Health Investigation Team’s report showed that 61% of young people surveyed were receiving or had received support from more than one type of mental health service, while government figures show more than 58,000 children, young people and their families accessed community mental support services in the first half of last year.

The Scottish Government used the findings and recommendations from SYP’s report to consider the critical importance of providing mental health support to children, young people and families across Scotland, alleviating the continued impact of the pandemic.

With young people continually highlighting the need for mental health and wellbeing support, SYP (click here for more) has welcomed the news of increased funding.

Ellie Criag MSYP Vice Chair of the Scottish Youth Parliament said: “Young people have told their MSYPs for years that mental health support is a priority for them and we know for services to be effective, they need to be properly resourced.

“This welcome funding announcement highlights the power of youth-led research into issues which affect young people. We were able to capture evidence, as peers, facilitating focus groups which would not have been possible through adult led research.”

First Minister Humza Yousaf said: “This further £30 million will fund community-based projects which are focused on prevention and early intervention, and this is a significant step forward in supporting people’s mental health and wellbeing by making sure they can easily access the help they need, when and where they need it.”

The new funding means more than £65 million has been made available to local authorities since 2020 to deliver community-based mental health and wellbeing support for five to 24 year-olds and their families, which includes mentoring, art-based therapies, digital services, whole-family support, counselling and sport or physical activities.

For more information on Scottish Youth Parliament’s youth-led approach to evaluating community based mental health services, click here: syp.org.uk/taking-a-youth-led-approach-to-evaluating-community-based-mental-health-services

Scottish Youth Parliament

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Annual Conference 2024

Join us on 29 & 30 May at Scottish Gas Murrayfield Stadium, Edinburgh

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Participation and engagement work

Find out more about how we embed the inclusion and participation of children and young people in our work

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Our membership offer

Be part of the largest national children's sector membership organisation in Scotland

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Enquire

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Reach

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Children in Scotland joins campaign to put children at the heart of policy making

Children in Scotland has given its support to a campaign that aims to put babies, children and young people at the heart of policy making. Children At The Table led by The Children’s Charities Coalition, a partnership of leading UK children’s charities: Action for Children, Barnardo’s, The Children’s Society, the National Children’s Bureau and NSPCC, is a collaboration with young people and has the support of over 100 charities.

New data released by the Coalition highlights that children feel politicians don’t understand their lives and aren’t listening to them as the country prepares for a general election. The charities surveyed 1,000 children and 1,000 adults and the results from children found that:

  • 62% of UK children think that politicians don’t understand the issues that affect children and young people today.
  • Almost three quarters (73%) don’t feel that children are listened to by politicians.
  • 66% don’t feel they have a say when it comes to decisions politicians make about things which are important to them.

When asked what they would like politicians to focus on to improve children and young people’s lives, more than a quarter of children (27%) said helping families struggling with money and having the basic things they need. Nearly one in five (18%) want children and young people’s mental health prioritised.

Childhood health and wellbeing is also a concern for adults, most of whom don’t think that children today are safer, happier or healthier than when they were children and only 16% think politicians fully or mostly understand the issues that affect children and young people.

Children are a priority for people across the UK, with 84% of adults saying that they think it’s important for political parties to outline their plans for children and young people in their manifestos.

It’s estimated that more than 1 in 4 UK children live in poverty and 1.4 million are thought to have a mental health disorder. Research from The Children’s Society last November found that an estimated 1 in 5 children (20%) are worried about how much money their family has, while half are ‘sometimes’ worried (52%).

David Mackay, Head of Policy, Projects and Participation, at Children in Scotland said:

"Children in Scotland has spent over three decades embedding children's voices in policy making, and looking at the results  of this survey it is clear that this work has never been more important. We are delighted to support the Children At The Table Campaign, with the strong belief that it is only through engaging children and young people in meaningful, ongoing dialogue that we can get to the heart of the issues that most affect them, and therefore make worthwhile decisions for change."

The campaign asks that the next Prime Minister and Chancellor be champions for children - by putting their needs and voices at the heart of decision making.

To support the Children At The Table campaign, please visit and sign their petition.

Annual Conference 2024

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Enquire

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Free childcare management platform launched in Scotland

Challenges with childcare – either finding it or affording it – is a hot topic at the moment with research suggesting that more and more parents are choosing to leave the workforce in an attempt to save money.

According to research from Flexible Childcare Services Scotland (FCSS), more than a third of parents (36%) find it difficult to find preschool childcare, 76% said this was due to affordability issues. Of those parents who found it difficult to find childcare 67% would rely on friends of family and 63% would either reduce their working hours or choose not to work or attend education at all.

One parent said: “The waiting lists are long and costs high. It makes more sense for one parent not to work at all.”

Another said, “It is a sacrifice to our household income to have childcare in order to work full time and I do not have support from other family members.”

With the average cost of a part time nursery place in the UK at £148 per week, it’s no wonder that parents are finding childcare inaccessible.

Thankfully there’s an innovative platform that aims to help both parents and providers.

Caerus [care-us] is a new childcare management tool that helps parents to find, book and pay for all of their childcare needs – early learning & childcare, school age childcare and children’s clubs and activities – all in one single platform.

It helps childcare providers to advertise their services, take bookings, manage their service users, input observations and make sure that they have enough team members to support the successful delivery of their activities.

The software also allows them to offer a flexible childcare model – a model that actively helps parents to save money as they only pay for the time they use.

Caerus doesn’t force providers to become flexible but with the option of offering hourly spaces childcare providers can sell extra spaces, maximise their capacity and increase their profits while simultaneously giving parents the childcare choices they desperately need.

And the best news is, Caerus is free to use, for both parents and providers.

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New project supports children and young people to access the mental health benefits of live music

New research, published today (Thursday 21 March 2024), identifies ways more children and young people in Scotland can experience the mental health and wellbeing benefits of live music.

The Live Music and Mental Health project, delivered by Children in Scotland, Scottish Ensemble and the University of Stirling between May and October 2023, explored the barriers to children and young people engaging with live music and supported them to co-create solutions to enable better access to support their mental health and wellbeing. The findings from the project have been published in a new report today.

In a series of in-person workshops, referred to as Innovation Labs, in Inverness, Stirling and East Glasgow, over 90 attendees, including children and young people, youth workers, music professionals and mental health practitioners came together to experience a range of live music performances and activities. The groups engaged in more traditional audience experiences as well as interactive performances exploring mindfulness and physical space.

The project heard about the key barriers to engaging with live music experiences which included cost, transport, safety, and additional support needs.

The findings present new ideas for future live music interventions that could support children and young people’s mental health and wellbeing. Participants identified a range of different factors to improve access which included:

  • Free or heavily subsidised tickets
  • Youth-led programming or co-ordination of festivals and venues
  • Festivals for children and young people offering a range of music styles
  • Festivals and gigs for children and young people in their local areas
  • Free and/or specialist transport to and from venues
  • Safe and quiet spaces for young people at music events
  • Live streaming of live music events
  • Events that involved big names and emerging musicians
  • Family-friendly music activities during the day
  • Live music events that included opportunities for young people to get involved in music-making
  • Apps to support young people to connect with venues and live music events
  • Involvement of businesses from the local community.

The innovative project method, which followed an intergenerational, co-design approach, also provided important learning on how to overcome some of the challenges of this type of project work to ensure that all children and young people, regardless of their age, are treated as equal partners and feel empowered to share their views.

Musicians, music providers and venues are encouraged to use the findings from the report to support the planning or hosting of live music events. Children in Scotland, University of Stirling and Scottish Ensemble will now explore funding opportunities to turn some of the exciting project ideas contained in the report into reality.

 

David Mackay, Children in Scotland’s Head of Policy, Projects and Participation, said:

“Children and young people are experts in their own lives, and they have great ideas about how to improve their communities and the opportunities that are available to them. We know that there are rising rates of poor mental health and wellbeing among children and young people and it’s vital that they are involved in designing solutions to this problem.

“The Live Music and Mental Health Project provided an important platform for children and young people to share what’s important to them and work together with professionals to develop new approaches to supporting mental health and wellbeing. The report and findings will be of interest to anyone working on co-design projects with children and young people, and are particularly relevant for the arts and culture and mental health professionals.”

Stuart Burns, Scottish Ensemble’s Head of Artistic Planning, said:

“Collaboration is at the heart of what we do at Scottish Ensemble. The Live Music and Mental Health Project gave us an important opportunity to engage closely with children and young people as collaborators, so we as an arts organisation can better understand the interests and needs of young audiences.

“Live music is an interactive experience. Through the Innovation Labs we saw first hand the impact of live music on children and young people. The workshop format enabled the performers to actively engage with their audience, hearing in real time the impact of different approaches to performance on young people’s feelings and emotions.

“The project has helped us deepen our understanding of the important connection between audience and performer, and the barriers that audiences, in particular young audiences, face when accessing live music. We will use the findings of this report to investigate how best we can start to remove barriers children and young people face in accessing our work, and explore new ways of co-producing work with young people in the future.”

Dr Lynne Gilmour, University of Stirling, said:

“The Innovation Labs brought together lots of different people from diverse backgrounds, roles and age groups, and allowed young people to work with practitioners to come up with some brilliant ideas.

“We know that live music can be beneficial to children and young people’s mental health and wellbeing and now have some great co-produced ideas of how to deliver live music in a format that is more accessible and acceptable, not only to children and young people themselves, but also to those delivering events.

“It can be challenging for some adults and professionals to give equal power to the voices of young people and this project embraced some really creative methods to facilitate intergenerational co-production.”

Click here to read the full Live Music and Mental Health report

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Young people’s experiences shaping the Covid-19 Inquiry

As examinations into the Covid-19 response currently take place across the UK, organisations are being encouraged to support young people (aged 18-25) to share their experiences and help shape recommendations for the future.

Yesterday (Tuesday 19 March), Children in Scotland’s Chief Executive, Dr Judith Turbyne, gave evidence at Day 26 of the Scottish Covid-19 Inquiry’s Health and Social Care Impact Hearings. Highlighting some of the many ways in which children and young people were impacted, Judith also emphasised how their experiences during the pandemic could have been improved if their views were considered from the beginning.

As examinations into the Covid-19 response currently take place across the UK, children and young people have opportunities to input and shape recommendations for what needs to be done for the country to be better prepared in the future.

Led by the independent and impartial UK Covid-19 Inquiry, Every Story Matters is one of the tools for sharing personal stories for anyone aged 18 and over. The campaign invites respondents to complete a short online form about their experience which will then be collated and analysed to provide anonymised evidence during the ongoing inquiries. With young people’s lives so uniquely affected by the pandemic, the Inquiry has stressed the importance of hearing their stories directly.

Organisations working with young people (aged 18-25) are being asked to support the Inquiry by sharing the opportunity to participate in the campaign. With the uniqueness and complexity of each individual experience, the Inquiry has created a number of resources to support participation (Click here for more).

Insights from Every Story Matters will be combined with bespoke research being conducted by independent research specialists, Verian, to ensure children and young people’s first-hand experiences shape the future of the Inquiry.

Children in Scotland’s Chief Executive, Dr Judith Turbyne said:

From talking to the children, young people, families and organisations we work with across Scotland, we have heard so many stories of the different and often difficult ways in which people were impacted by the pandemic.

“The evidence I presented from Children in Scotland at the Scottish Covid-19 Inquiry yesterday offers further insight into the experiences of children and young people during this time. However, to create a full picture of what happened and how the country can improve in the future, it is so important that we hear from children and young people directly.

“The UK Covid-19 Inquiry is creating safe and supportive opportunities for children and young people to participate in research and the more stories they receive, the richer the tapestry they can stitch together.”

Click here to find out more about ‘Every Story Matters’ and access the online form

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An accessible new learning portal for the children’s sector launches

An accessible new online learning portal which aims to support practitioners working across children’s services in Scotland launches today (Monday 18 March 2024).

The portal was developed by The Open University (OU) in Scotland in partnership with Children in Scotland and sees the two organisations combining their shared expertise in education to support the upskilling of the children’s sector and help improve the lives of children and young people across Scotland.

Offering a wide range of free courses, the portal has been curated to help meet practitioners’ learning needs. Courses are focused in key skill areas including education in the early years, additional support needs and mental health and wellbeing. As well as professional development specific to children’s services, there are also courses in technology, leadership and equality, diversity and inclusion.

The courses have also been chosen to complement Children in Scotland’s comprehensive Learning Programme which includes in-person conferences and residentials, professional diplomas and online webinars (click here for more).

As a globally recognised leader in distanced learning, OU’s online resources offer practitioners the upmost flexibility meaning that each course can be started, paused and restarted again at any-time. Courses range from two to 24 hours and learning can be done in a place most convenient to students.

Simon Massey, Head of Engagement and Learning, Children in Scotland

“From today, we are delighted to invite practitioners to start exploring this new learning portal specifically created for the children’s sector. It has been fantastic working with the team at The Open University to create this exciting new tool. At Children in Scotland, we are committed to developing the children’s sector workforce and, listening to our members and partners, we know that often the time they can commit to professional development is limited. With the flexibility of the courses in this portal, it offers a high-quality and accessible learning tool for many people working across the sector. We hope you enjoy delving into the topics.”

Page Munro, Partnerships Manager, The Open University

“I’m delighted to share our new curated learning portal for practitioners working with children and young people. The Open University and Children in Scotland have worked together to create a fantastic resource for people working across the sector who are looking to gain new skills in a wide range of relevant areas.

 With a wide range of free Open University courses available, there will be something for everyone, no matter where you are in your career. The courses are delivered entirely online and can be completed flexibly in your own time, so they’re perfect for helping you upskill alongside your other work and life commitments. 

You’ll be able to access courses in key subject areas like mental health, early years, additional support needs, leadership and much more. We really hope you’ll find the portal a valuable resource for helping you develop in your career.”

Click here to start exploring the new learning portal

 

Our new learning portal with OU

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Children in Scotland's Annual Conference

Find out more about our flagship event at Murrayfield Stadium, Edinburgh, on 29 & 30 May 2024.

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Enquire

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Reach

The website for young people offers advice and support on accessing their rights

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Children in Scotland shortlisted for two prestigious awards

Children in Scotland has been shortlisted for two awards at the upcoming Edinburgh Chamber of Commerce Business Awards 2024, which are this year centred around the theme of “grow, scale, succeed”.

The judging panel selected Children in Scotland for inclusion in the Service Excellence Award, and the Employer of the Year category, recognising the hard work of teams across the organisation.

Awarded to businesses committed to delivering the best experience and service possible, with evidence of customer satisfaction and endorsements, our nomination for the Service Excellence Award comes for the work of Enquire, Resolve, and My Rights, My Say.

Providing practical support, advice and representation for children, young people, parents and families throughout Scotland, in 2023, 100% of parents and carers who gave feedback on the Enquire helpline rated the service as “excellent”, while the My Rights, My Say team grew from two to five associates, highlighting an increased demand for the advocacy and support service.

The Employer of the Year award aims to recognise businesses implementing initiatives to benefit employee health and wellbeing, and Children in Scotland was shortlisted for the positive visions and values embedded into all our work, as well as our commitment to flexible working policies, on-going training opportunities, and our focus on work-life balance.

Winners across all 15 award categories will be announced during a ceremony at the Edinburgh International Conference Centre (EICC) on Thursday 29 February 2024.

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Embedding the principles of The Promise

As part of Holyrood Insight’s Keeping The Promise: Next Steps Digital Conference, which was held last week, Children in Scotland’s Head of Policy, Projects and Participation, David Mackay, was invited to talk about how we are embedding the principles of The Promise through our work.

For those who missed the conference, here, David explores how our rights-based policy work, training and learning opportunities, support services, and participation projects are leading the way for change.

As an organisation dedicated to giving all children in Scotland an equal chance to flourish, we are committed to embedding the key principles of The Promise into everything we do.

Working directly with children and young people with care experience, and with professionals supporting them, we have kept firm sight of the recommendations included in the Independent Care Review reports and aim to share knowledge around the key foundations of The Promise in order to make progress.

Through projects such as Changing our World, the Promise Partnership Project, the Inclusion Ambassadors and the Supporting the Third Sector Project, we have been able to explore voice, people and scaffolding, three of the five key foundations of The Promise.

Voice

The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) is now part of Scottish legislation, having received unanimous support in a Scottish Parliament vote on 7 December, and then achieving royal assent in early January.

Providing an important platform upon which to build policy and practice is UNCRC Article 12 – children’s right to be heard, and for their views to be listened to and taken into account. As part of work to embed UNCRC, we must consider how we listen to children and young people with care experience, both as individuals and as a collective voice.

To Keep the Promise, we must seek out the voices of children and young people in care, and on the edges of care, supporting them to share their views appropriately. At the conference last week, Louise Hunter, Chief Executive at Who Cares? Scotland (click here for more), spoke passionately about the importance of the need for high-quality, accessible advocacy services for children and young people. We also heard from Andrew and Lisa, two young people, who shared their views as part of the Our Hearings, Our Voice group, an example some of the principles of good engagement with children and young people.

It’s also vitally important that we use existing evidence wisely, and we don’t keep asking children and young people the same questions repeatedly. We need young people to trust that we are listening and working to change things when they share their views with us.

People

We need a valued and supported workforce that is able to develop positive relationships with children and young people with care experience and ensure they are sustainable.

We know the transformative power of relationships, so it’s important that we invest in people and make sure the conditions are in place to support these relationships.

The Promise Oversight Board Report Two, published last summer, highlighted that the workforce is “over-stretched and under-resourced” and that needs to change. We need to invest in staff, and in training and development, to address these challenges.

Skilled, knowledgeable staff, who understand trauma and trauma-informed approaches can make a big difference to children’s lives. We are currently working on a project with children and young people and pupil support staff to improve the support care experienced pupils receive in school. Staff have highlighted the need for improved training to understand trauma as well as awareness-raising to tackle stigma of care within school communities. The Promise is clear – we must have high aspirations for our care experienced pupils.

Scaffolding

The Promise states that children, families and the workforce must be supported by a system that is there when it’s needed, providing help, support and accountability.

Policy coherence is a significant part of the big picture. We have been working in silos for too long, and we must ensure that cross portfolio work is coordinated, recognising the links between various policy areas including poverty, mental health, employability, housing, and family support.

We also need high quality and accessible services for children, young people and families, with statutory partners and the third sector working together in a joined-up way. We have seen some positive examples of this through the Supporting the Third Sector Project (click here for more), including activity linked to the Whole Family Wellbeing Fund.

The conference last week was a reminder that across the sector, we have seen lots of positive practice and genuine commitment to Keeping the Promise, with hardworking, passionate and skilled staff making a positive difference for so many. However, we still have a long way to go against a challenging backdrop.

Embedding the principles of The Promise at Children in Scotland has helped us to keep sight of what is important, and focus on how we listen, collaborate, explore new ways of working and how we share our learning in order to #KeepThePromise to Scotland’s children and young people.

About the author

David Mackay is Children in Scotland’s Head of Policy, Projects and Participation

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Looking to upskill your staff? Discover how commissioned training is helping charities across Scotland

For charities, organisations and practitioners working with children and young people, it is important to continually develop new skills, knowledge and expertise to provide the best care possible.

To help organisations keep up with best practice across the sector, make the most of budgets, meet key objectives, and fit education into busy schedules, Children in Scotland offers a wide range of learning opportunities – and one of the most popular is commissioned training.

We offer commissioned training (click here for more) on a vast range of topics at different levels – both online and in-person – and our expert Learning & Events team can also help to identify your organisation’s learning needs if you’re not sure where to start.

From bespoke programmes to one-off sessions, designed precisely to your requirements, we have experience delivering impactful training that equips staff and individuals with all the skills and knowledge they need to make a difference in their role, covering children's rights and the UNCRC (click here for more), trauma-informed practice, mental health and much more. Plus, with 94% of participants in 2022/2023 describing the courses as "excellent", we are setting the industry standard for quality training.

One of the most requested training themes we offer is child protection and, below, one of our member organisations shares why our training was the perfect fit for their charity, while providing insight into the commissioned training process.

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Allison Barr, Chief Executive of Team Jak Foundation

“I was a primary teacher before taking on my boy’s legacy, so I vowed that we would make sure we were fully trained, fully knowledgeable, and fully experienced in everything we do as a charity. It’s so important when you’re working with children’s lives that you do it properly.

“We recently completed child protection training with Children in Scotland at our Livingston office, which was truly bespoke to us. The trainer was able to tailor some of the case studies to specific instances that might happen within the situations we are dealing with, and our staff found that really, really helpful.

“We found the training to be so helpful, we’ve already planned to do another course for our younger volunteers. We felt that due to a lot of the language used in child protection training, we needed to be careful with our approach. The next course will be tailored to both our charity and the children we’re working with, which is fantastic.

“A saying I used a lot when I was a teacher is, “To teach is to touch a life forever” – and it’s the same when you are working with children as a charity. When you have responsibility for a child, you have to get it right, and part of that is child protection.

“Children in Scotland has proven over and over to us that it is a reliable source. We’ve been on courses with different organisations, and every time it has been the same thing but changed ever so slightly. With Children in Scotland, every training course is unique, bespoke, and their staff go the extra mile.”

Team Jak Foundation provide emotional, social and practical support for children and young people with cancer, as well as their family and friends. Click here for more information: teamjak.org.uk

Click here to find out more about commissioned training: childreninscotland.org.uk/commissioned-training

Alternatively, you can contact the Learning & Events team to arrange a time to discuss your training needs in more detail by emailing: events@childreninscotland.org.uk

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